NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) is celebrating its 50th Birthday! First opened on May 15th, 1964 ERIC continues the long tradition of ongoing innovation and enhancement.

Learn more about the history of ERIC here. PDF icon

ERIC Number: ED432039
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1999-Apr
Pages: 69
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Effects of Block Scheduling on Grade Point Averages.
Williams, Laura M.
This study investigated the effects of block scheduling on student learning. It compared the grade-point averages (GPAs) of one group of students during their 9th-grade year while under the traditional 7-period day to the GPAs of their 10th-grade year under the 4-by-4 block schedule. The text offers a history of block scheduling and lists some of the reasons for the shift to block scheduling, such as the more relaxed pace associated with block schedules. Disadvantages and concerns related to this type of scheduling are also listed and include conflicts with extracurricular programs and difficulties in balancing students' schedules. For the study, 198 students, out of a total enrollment of 650, in a rural high school in West Virginia participated. Three types of GPAs were used to compare the two schedules: GPAs in English and math; GPAs in English, math, science, and social studies; and GPAs in all subjects. Descriptive statistics and dependent sample t-tests were conducted on each of the three groups of GPAs. Results indicate no significant differences in GPAs in any of the three areas compared. It is claimed that to examine the effect of block scheduling on education, other factors will need to be considered. Appendices contain comparisons of English and math GPAs, core class GPAs and overall GPAs in ninth and tenth grades. Contains 35 references. ((RJM)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: West Virginia
Note: Master of Arts thesis, Salem-Teikyo University.