NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) is celebrating its 50th Birthday! First opened on May 15th, 1964 ERIC continues the long tradition of ongoing innovation and enhancement.

Learn more about the history of ERIC here. PDF icon

PDF pending restoration PDF pending restoration
ERIC Number: ED430687
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1999-Apr
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Adults' Attitudes about Children's Gender Norm Transgressions.
Blakemore, Judith E. Owen
This study examined college students' knowledge and attitudes regarding children's gender, and social and moral norms, and compared their evaluations of violation of each norm type. Participating were 140 female and 67 male college students ranging in age from 17 to 46 years, 33 of whom were parents. Subjects were asked questions related to toys, games, play styles, adult occupations, adult parental roles, hairstyles, and clothing. They were also asked about social norms (eating ice cream with fingers versus a spoon and coughing on someone versus covering one's mouth) and moral norms (pinching someone and stealing money). For each item, participants were asked who usually played with or did the item or what was usually done; whether it was possible for a child of the other gender to do the item or if it could be done; and how they would feel about a child who violated the norm. Findings indicated that participants thought it possible to violate all norms except for becoming a parent of the other gender. Boys' gender norm violations were rated more negatively than girls', while both were rated less negatively than social or moral violations. Women rated gender norm violations more positively than men, but there were no sex differences in ratings of social or moral violations. Boys' appearance-related norm transgressions were rated more negatively than girls', but girls' loud rough play was rated more negatively than boys' quiet play. Other gender norm violations were seen as positive or neutral, except for Barbie play by boys. (KB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Moral Behavior
Note: Poster presented at the Biennial Meeting of the So