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ERIC Number: ED418770
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997
Pages: 109
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-888324-04-X
Rethinking the Brain: New Insights into Early Development.
Shore, Rima
Recent research on early brain development holds several implications for parents, teachers, health professionals, and policymakers. This report, based on the proceedings from a 1996 national conference on the importance of early brain development for the nation's future well-being, highlights major findings, summarizes their implications for policy and practice in education and human services, notes areas of debate, and points to future research areas. Part 1, "Breakthroughs in Neuroscience--Why Now?" describes the development of new research tools enabling the study of the brain, the social and ideological context for current research, and new interest in the brain across disciplines. Part 2, comprising the bulk of the report, discusses the following key lessons learned from the research: (1) development hinges on the interplay between nature and nurture; (2) early care has a long-lasting impact on development, the ability to learn, and the ability to regulate emotion; (3) the brain has a remarkable capacity to change, but timing is crucial; (4) there are times when negative experiences or absence of appropriate stimulation are more likely to have serious and sustained effects; and (5) there is substantial evidence for the efficacy of early intervention. Part 3 highlights areas of agreement and debate at the conference and presents implications for policy and practice. The report's glossary defines terms related to the neurosciences. Two appendices list conference speakers and give examples of early intervention programs. Contains approximately 150 references. (KB)
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Publication Type: Information Analyses; Reports - General
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Families and Work Inst., New York, NY.
Identifiers: Brain Development; Critical Period (Psychology); Neurosciences; Traumas; Vulnerability