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ERIC Number: ED418529
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1998-Apr
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Including Students with Disabilities in Accountability Systems.
CISP Issue Brief, v3 n2 Apr 1998
The Consortium on Inclusive Schooling Practices (1996) developed a framework to analyze state and local policies and their relationship to the development of inclusive schooling practices. The framework focuses on standards-based systemic reform across six major policy areas: curriculum, student assessment, accountability, personnel development and professional training, finance, and governance. This brief discusses accountability by defining the concept and illustrating six approaches to its implementation, including: (1) accountability through performance reporting; (2) accountability through monitoring and compliance with standards or regulations; (3) accountability through incentive systems; (4) accountability through reliance on the market, including vouchers and open enrollment strategies; (5) accountability through changing the locus of authority or control of the schools; and (6) accountability through changing professional roles. System and student accountability are discussed, as well as the different consequences states have mandated for district and school performance. Specific perspectives on accountability as it relates to the inclusion of students with disabilities are reviewed, including indicators of accountability; federal, state, and local perspectives; and suggested family assurances. The brief concludes that students with disabilities are underrepresented in assessment systems and that there are few if any incentives for their inclusion. (CR)
Mark McNutt, Child & Family Studies Program, Allegheny University of the Health Sciences, One Allegheny Center, Suite 510, Pittsburgh, PA 15212; telephone: 412-359-1654; fax: 412-359-1601; e-mail: mcnutt@pgh.auhs.edu
Publication Type: Collected Works - Serials; Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: Special Education Programs (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Allegheny Univ. of the Health Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA.; Consortium on Inclusive Schooling Practices, Alexandria, VA.
Identifiers: N/A