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ERIC Number: ED418336
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997-Oct-9
Pages: 85
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Intergenerational Impact of Alcohol on Children: A Native Perspective.
McCorrister, Kandy
A review of recent literature suggests excessive drinking by parents has a negative impact on the behaviors of the child. The families in First Nations communities in Canada have suffered considerably because of alcohol and the pressures of the surrounding non-native community; valuable teachings of the Elders have come under attack and the loss of these teachings has left communities in turmoil; the role of the parent has been taken over by a loosely connected extended family, which can result in children feeling unwanted and unloved by the natural parent. Alcohol leaves many First Nation communities in a state of oppression as the young people soak up the behaviors being modeled by parents, teachers, relatives, friends, elders and leaders. This paper presents a study that examined the intergenerational impact of alcohol on First Nations children. Interviews with substance abuse counselors and/or elders from the community guided the process of data collection. Seven stories from participants and two from counselors are reported and related to the questions: "How does the intergenerational impact of alcohol affect children today?" and "What can we do about it?" Five issues are reported on: (1) "Learned Behaviors Not Our Own"; (2) "Focus of Concern" (the psychological gaps in one's life due to inconsistent parenting, violence and destructiveness within the family); (3) "Is Leaving the Answer?"; (4) "Healing within: Spiritual Help"; and (5) "Loneliness and Healing." Five recommendations for recovery and healing are presented. Appendices include letters and interview protocols. (EMK)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: First Nations; Intergenerational Factors
Note: Master's Research Project, Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba.