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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: ED411067
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Contrast of Amount and Type of Activity in Elementary School Years between Academically Successful and Unsuccessful Youth.
Madden, Deirdre; Brueckman, Judith; Littlejohn, Kevin V.
This study compared the participation in various types of activities during the elementary school years of academically successful and unsuccessful youth. The academically successful group consisted of 63 college students from lower level general communication classes. The two unsuccessful comparison groups consisted of 53 youth, ages 13 to 16 years, from a nonresidential alternative school, who had been suspended from regular classrooms; and 12 male youths, ages 5 to 17, from a juvenile center, who had displayed aggression in the academic setting. The Activities Participation Scale was devised, based on activities listed by college students that they remembered doing when they were 5 through 8 and 9 through 12 years old. All subjects indicated on the scale the frequency of engagement in activities in the areas of sports, dance, camp, music, work, family activities, church related activities, other structured activities, and other unstructured activities. Findings indicated that: (1) participation in activities overall increased with age to a greater extent in the successful group than in the comparison group; (2) when required school activities were eliminated in the comparison groups, the total percentage of participants in sports was lower than in the successful group; (3) creative activities were indicated less by the comparison groups than by the successful group; (4) television viewing and video games were indicated by more male comparison group participants; and (5) females were more likely than males to participate in a greater variety of activities. (The questionnaire and data tables are appended. Contains eight references.) (KB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Family Activities