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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: ED410396
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997-Aug-15
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Effects of Strong Interest Inventory Feedback on Career Beliefs.
Day, Michael Andrew; Luzzo, Darrell Anthony
A study evaluated the effects of Strong Interest Inventory (SII) completion and participation in a theoretically based model of SII feedback/interpretation on the social cognitive career beliefs of 99 first-year students at a southwestern university. The Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale--Short Form (CDMSES-SF) measured each participant's degree of belief that he or she can successfully complete tasks necessary for making effective career decisions. Career beliefs of participants were measured by the Career Beliefs Inventory. Participants completed both instruments and were randomly assigned to either the SII feedback condition, control, or SII completion-only group. Students who completed the SII and participated in the feedback session were more likely to believe that they are personally responsible for career decision making than were students who completed the SII without feedback. Students who completed the SII with or without feedback were more likely to believe that career success and satisfaction were the result of hard work and effort than were the control group. There were no significant differences in a sense of control over career decision making among the three groups. (Appendixes include 37 references and 2 tables.) (YLB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Strong Interest Inventory
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (Chicago, IL, August 15, 1997). Research supported by the Strong Research Advisory Board.