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ERIC Number: ED409601
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997-Jul
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Islamic World View and Global Values vis-a-vis Effective Intercultural Communication.
Dick, Robert C.; Robinson, Brenda M.
Suggesting that more study and understanding of Islam vis-a-vis the West could open more effective channels in intercultural communication, this paper addresses Islamic world views and values as they undergird the communication process. Although generalizations about Islam are difficult to make, the paper states that Islam is the second largest religion in the world, and includes 45 Muslim countries as well as Muslim communities in other countries. In an overview on the historical emergence of Islam, the paper discusses its founding principles. In the next section on characteristic Islamic values, the paper traces the historical development of the religion and its 2 branches of government, Sunni and Shi'i--Sunnis now constitute 85% of the Islamic population. Focusing on recent years, the paper finds that changes have occurred that appear to greatly shape Islamic world views and values reflected in the communication with and within that religion. The paper offers a summary of values generally attributed to Muslims: collectivism, egalitarianism, fatalism, and verbalism. Noting that today, after the impact of colonialism and Western imperialism on the Islamic world view, it is inaccurate to assert that "there is no separation of church and state" in Islam, the paper nevertheless finds that many Muslim leaders are "walking a tightrope" trying to persuade their followers to accept the good about the West. The paper concludes that whether Muslims are highly conservative or moderate reformers, the rest of the world can practice with them the communication principles of openness, provisionalness, empathy, and equality. (Contains 13 references.) (NKA)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Communication Behavior; Communication Channels; World Religions
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial World Communicatio