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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) is celebrating its 50th Birthday! First opened on May 15th, 1964 ERIC continues the long tradition of ongoing innovation and enhancement.

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ERIC Number: ED408002
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Texas Study: A Regression Analysis of Selected Factors that Influence the Scores of Students on the TASP Test.
High, Clennis F.
A study was conducted to identify factors affecting student performance on the Texas Academic Skills Program (TASP), a state-mandated measure designed to assess students' basic skills and competencies. TASP and Assessment of Student Skills for Entry Transfer (ASSET) scores were analyzed for 328 academic track students from 6 community colleges in Texas, while students' age; ethnicity; number of remedial classes taken; college type (i.e., urban, suburban, and rural); and sex were also included as TASP predictor variables in a multiple regression analysis. The analysis suggested that students' ASSET scores were the best predictors of scores on all three sections of the TASP, while age and ethnicity were also good predictors. The strongest relationship was found between scores on the reading section of the ASSET and TASP tests, while the weakest was found between the mathematics sections of the tests. The effects of age and ethnicity, however, were most pronounced on the mathematics section of the TASP. The analysis also suggested that neither the number of remedial classes taken by students, the type of college students attended, nor student gender were significantly related to outcomes on the TASP. (HAA)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Assessment of Student Skills for Entry Transfer; Texas Academic Skills Program
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Te