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ERIC Number: ED397037
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1996-Apr
Pages: 30
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Social Reconstruction Model of Supervision.
Seda, E. Elliott
This paper presents a social reconstructionist model of supervision. The model connects schools and society, and considers the vital role teachers, students, staff, and others play in developing, designing, and implementing reforms in school and society. The model is based on the philosophy of social reconstructionism, which views schools as cultural, political, and social agencies interacting with the general society, and the purpose of education as cultivating a critical examination of subject matter knowledge and how it impacts society. From this philosophy of education, teaching is conceptualized as an activity that fosters change in school and society and as an interactive activity between teachers and students. This conception of teaching leads to a conception of supervision as transformational, involving all activities that have a direct impact on teaching and learning and of instructional development as the primary focus in the educational process. Student development, another model component, is seen as connecting student learning to societal concerns. Several models of staff development consistent with social reconstructionism are briefly described. For curriculum development a nontechnical-nonscientific approach that stresses subjective student involvement is recommended. Finally, the school-community development component is seen to be critical since the school's purpose is to prepare students for community participation. (Contains 25 references.) (ND)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Social Constructivism
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, April 8-12, 1996).