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ERIC Number: ED396817
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1996-Apr
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
A Study of Order-Managing Skills Used in Group Activities by Early Childhood Student Teachers in Taiwan.
Chen, Ya-Mei
This report describes a study which examined group-order managing skills used by early childhood student teachers in Taiwan, how these skills were used, and the level of student teacher satisfaction with these skills. Fifty-six student teachers from a 2-year training program at the National Taipei Teachers College completed an event-recording form for the 3-week period of their student teaching to document a total of 423 events involving group-order managing skills. Classes were for 3-, 4-, or 5-year-olds, with about 30 children per class. Group-order managing skills, such as management of children's behavior during small group activities, were used most often during sedentary indoor activities, with implementing body movements or games, using verbal instruction, and playing musical instruments or rhythms as the most common categories. Student teachers used the same skills repeatedly, implemented different skills in succession, and searched for new skills. They were generally satisfied with their skills, but sought to modify their skills for better classroom management. Using music and games was more frequently implemented during mobile and transitional periods and received higher ratings of satisfaction than other types of skills. Reward techniques were more often used with younger children and punishment techniques were more often used with older children. Contains seven references. (KDFB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Event Sampling; National Taipei Teachers College (Taiwan); Observational Studies; Taiwan
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, April 8-12, 1996).