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ERIC Number: ED395378
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1996-Mar
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
School Development Planning: Problems and Possibilities. What We Know and What We Have Yet To Learn.
Giles, Corrie
Local management of schools, parental choice, and accountability were crucial themes of Great Britain's 1988 Education Reform Act. Central government's belief in market forces as the key to sustained systemwide school improvement was further supported by the 1993 Education Act, which increased the variety of school offerings for parental choice by allowing specialization and the selection of pupils by ability. The changes have made it necessary for schools to professionalize their strategic, tactical, and operation planning. However, schools continue to experience difficulties in successfully adopting site-based planning approaches, such as school-development planning. This paper identifies key problems with the school-development planning approach as presently adopted in England and Wales and recently incorporated in the Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED) inspection process. It suggests a more effective approach for managing change and school improvement, with a focus on North American literature describing the successful implementation of site-based planning and the school-growth planning approach implemented by a number of school boards in Ontario, Canada. Schools in Great Britain will have to individually determine their strategic direction in the educational market place, identify the type of school that they intend to become, and plan the range of services that they intend to provide. (Contains 38 references.) (Author/LMI)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: England; Ontario
Note: Commonwealth Council for Educational Administration Symposium paper presented at the Research Conference of the British Educational Management and Administration Society (Cambridge, England, United Kingdom, March 25-27, 1996).