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ERIC Number: ED394951
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Oct
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
A Variety of Ideal Visions: A Study of Teacher Education.
Morton, Mary Lou; And Others
A study by teacher education students identified the views on teacher education of 12 professors and administrators involved in teacher education at a large university in the Midwest. It was hoped that these perspectives would provide insights into possible areas of growth and change, and capture various visions of an "ideal" teacher education program. The data, gathered through interviews, were analyzed for common themes and reported as visions and challenges. Common visions were described in terms of "what is" versus "what should be"; perceptions of the type of students in the ideal program; support for the study of multicultural ideas and diverse learners' needs; collaborating in the university community; and quality teaching in both the university and the schools. Challenges were described in terms of a connection between theory and practice; the quality of preservice teachers; the large number of students in the teacher education program; and the lack of focus in the teacher education program. The respondents were enthusiastic about their respective roles in teacher education and idealistic in their visions, and provided insights into the challenges of attaining these visions. They indicated a desire to be involved in working toward a teacher education program that is more in tune with needed reforms in education and society, and they stressed the need for the university to value the time professors need to spend to set up collaborative structures between the university and schools and among university staff members. (Contains 11 references.) (ND)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Idealism
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Mid-Western Educational Research Association (October 11-14, 1995).