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ERIC Number: ED394706
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1996-Apr-9
Pages: 50
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Does the Village Still Raise the Child? A Collaborative Study of Changing Child-Rearing and Community Mobilization in Kenya.
Swadener, Beth Blue; And Others
Using a micro-ethnographic design employing interview and observational data, a year long collaborative study examined the impacts of economic and social change on child-rearing and community mobilization in Kenya. Subjects were 462 parents, grandparents, older siblings, preschool teachers, community leaders, and other professionals having caregiving relationships with children under 3. The study examined a variety of contexts: traditional/pastoral, rural/agrarian, plantation/tea and coffee estates, and urban. Particular research foci included: (1) ascertaining ways in which traditional support systems and child-rearing practices contribute to the effective care of young children; (2) gathering information on how to strengthen these systems and practices; (3) understanding the process and significance of community participation and parent involvement in early childhood care; and (4) examining the relevance of formal early childhood education to families maintaining traditional lifestyles. Results showed that increasing poverty and the problems associated with poverty have had the largest impacts on child rearing. Particularly in plantation and urban settings, changes in family composition were also significant. In these settings, many parents had limited support systems for care of children under 3. Participative ethnographic study is needed to better ascertain and understand child care needs of families. (Contains 30 references.) (JW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Kenya
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, April 9, 1996).