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ERIC Number: ED394322
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Oct
Pages: 55
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Impact of Strategies-Based Instruction on Speaking a Foreign Language. Research Report, October 1995.
Cohen, Andrew D.; And Others
This study examined the contribution that formal strategies-based instruction might offer learners in University of Minnesota foreign language classrooms, focusing particularly on speaking skills. Of 55 intermediate students enrolled in college-level French and Norwegian foreign language classes, 32 participated in the experimental group who received strategies-based instruction. The remaining 23 served as a comparison group. Additional data on language learning and strategy use was obtained from 21 of the total 55 sample population; they represented three speaking-level abilities, as determined by their six instructors. All students completed the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) assessment instrument in the first week of classes and at term end. Taped protocols were rated by native French and near-native Norwegian speakers who did not know from which group the tapes were produced; evaluation was based on aspects of self-confidence in delivery, grammar and vocabulary use, and story elements and ordering. Results indicate that the experimental, strategy-based group outperformed the comparison group on the third of three speaking tasks: describing a city. Overall, it is concluded that the strategies-based instruction had a positive influence on the 10-week course results. Strategy-based speaking exercises appear to be very useful for improving speaking skills in foreign language learning. (Contains 16 references.) (NAV)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Center for International Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Language Resource Center.
Identifiers: Strategy Inventory for Language Learning; University of Minnesota