NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED394157
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Nov
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in Teaching Business and Professional Speaking.
Watt, Willis M.
A study examined the effects of a college business/professional speaking course on the communication skills' development of students. The research examined three hypotheses: (1) that student ratings of their own communication skills would show a significant improvement after a 16-week course on business and professional speaking; (2) that males and females would not show a significant difference in their appraisal of their communication skills following the course; and (3) that undergraduate and graduate students would not show significant differences in their appraisal of their communication skills following the course. The study substantiated the first hypothesis but not the second or third. With regard to the first hypothesis, it was observed that when students viewed a videotape of their performance and then discussed it with a teacher their performance skills improved. With regard to the second hypothesis, male students did not report a significant improvement in their skills, while female students did. There are some indications that males are more developed in terms of their public speaking skills; if these indications are accurate, they could explain why males did not experience the degree of improvement that females did. With regard to the third hypothesis, graduate students did not report the degree of improvement that undergraduates did. These results could be explained by the fact that graduate students have more professional experience and educational background. (TB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Self Report Measures
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Speech Communication Association (81st, San Antonio, TX, November 18-21, 1995).