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ERIC Number: ED393958
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1996-Mar
Pages: 3
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0889-8049
Downsizing Schools in Big Cities. ERIC Digest. No. 112.
Raywid, Mary Anne
This digest briefly reviews the current movement to downsize urban schools to help educators decide whether and why to pursue such a move, and to indicate which models appear most promising. Research evidence is strong that small schools benefit the entire school community. Small schools are particularly beneficial for disadvantaged youth, who profit from the extra attention and sense of belonging promoted in a small school. Putting several small schools into an existing large-school building can rejuvenate the building and enhance educational possibilities. The founding principles of small urban schools are: (1) cohesion; (2) autonomy; (3) focus or theme; and (4) a constituency assembled on the basis of shared interests. There are many difficulties in implementing small urban schools, but many more are being planned. They combine features currently being recommended by educational researchers as important in transforming schools. (Contains 10 references.) (SLD)
ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Institute for Urban and Minority Education, Teachers College, Box 40, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (free).
Publication Type: ERIC Publications; ERIC Digests in Full Text
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, New York, NY.
Identifiers: Downsizing; ERIC Digests
Note: Based on "Taking Stock: The Movement To Create Mini-Schools, Schools-within-Schools, and Other Small Schools," by Mary Anne Raywid.