NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED393102
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Mar
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Authentic Multiculturalism and Nontraditional Students: Voices from the "Contact Zone."
Flores, Juan
New multicultural anthologies too often end up looking suspiciously like the color palate of a paint-by-numbers kit. Canonical tokenism is quickly seen as a ruse by minority students and teachers who are circumspect and adept at uncovering counterfeits. As an alternative to tokenism, one recommendation is to use Patricia Bizzell's "contact zone" as a major theme in constructing a year-long pedagogical application of legitimizing cultural literature, seeking not only to impart a global education to students but also to foster cognitive grace by reconstructing Western study to naturally include historic participants of color in the loci of chronicled events and thereby authenticate their contributions. The course gives due weight to the study of the mainstream, traditional canon. Entering community college students have little grasp of history and hardly any knowledge concerning Western thought. Hence, comparative readings and discussions involve philosophy, religion, commercialization, industry, politics, and the revolutionary ethics instrumental in the West's political and economic metamorphosis. In the first portion of the course, specific authors include Max Weber, Charles Darwin, Frederic Jameson, E. L. Doctorow, Maxine Hong-Kingston, and John Fowles. Having established that ordinate relationships exist, the course's second section examines examples of cultural negotiation and authentication. In the third section, the course initiates a study of Latino and Native American Folk stories and poems. (TB)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Cultural Studies; Literary Canon
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (46th, Washington, DC, March 23-25, 1995).