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ERIC Number: ED390846
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Apr
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Viewing the Role of the Student Teacher Supervisor through Cross-Cultural Perspectives.
Lamont, Wendy K.; Arcand, Darlene S.
This study, conducted in the context of a Canadian Aboriginal teacher education program, sought to determine if student teachers', cooperating teachers', and university supervisors' perceptions about the role of the university supervisor differed, particularly when this triad was composed of individuals from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Participants consisted of aboriginal student teachers (N=29) enrolled in the Indian Teacher Education Program (ITEP) at the University of Saskatchewan (Canada) and their non-aboriginal cooperating teachers (N=41) and university supervisors (N=16): 84 in all. The "Role of the University Supervisor Survey," which assessed the perceptions of each participant with regards to the relative importance of selected roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor, was mailed to all participants. Anonymity was guaranteed. The final return rate of the surveys was 76 percent for student teachers, 85 percent for cooperating teachers, and 88 percent for university supervisors. Results indicated that university supervisors, student teachers, and cooperating teachers held similar perceptions of the university supervisor's role. Comparisons conducted in the post hoc analysis revealed a single significant difference between perceptions of student teachers and cooperating teachers: student teachers placed a lower level of priority on the role of the university supervisor to perform formative assessment procedures. Overall however, all groups generally agreed that the supervisor's most important roles were to facilitate feedback conferences; to observe and provide feedback to the student teacher; to provide moral support and encouragement; and to review time lines, requirements, and responsibilities. (Contains 23 references.) (JB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Saskatchewan; University of Saskatchewan (Canada)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 18-22, 1995).