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ERIC Number: ED390637
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Apr
Pages: 36
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Lakatosian Conceptual Change Teaching Strategy Based on Student Ability To Build Models with Varying Degrees of Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium.
Niaz, Mansoor
The main objective of the study reported in this paper was to construct a Lakatosian teaching strategy that can facilitate conceptual change in students' understanding of chemical equilibrium. The strategy is based on the premise that cognitive conflicts must have been engendered by the students themselves in trying to cope with different problem solving strategies. Results obtained (based on Venezuelan freshman students) show that the performance of the experimental group of students was generally better (especially on the immediate posttests) than that of the control group. It was concluded that a conceptual change teaching strategy must take into consideration the following aspects: core beliefs of the students in the topic; exploration of the relationship between core beliefs and student alternative conceptions; cognitive complexity of the core belief can be broken down into a series of related probing questions; students resist changes in their core beliefs by postulating auxiliary hypotheses in order to resolve their contradictions; students' responses based on their alternative conceptions must not be considered wrong, but rather as models; and students' misconceptions should be considered as alternative conceptions that compete with the present scientific theories and at times recapitulate theories scientists held in the past. Contains 53 references. (Author/JRH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Alternative Conceptions; Lakatos (Imre); Venezuela
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (68th, San Francisco, CA, April 1995).