NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED390525
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Mar
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Family Process and High School Adjustment of Boys Who Showed Depressive Symptoms with and without Co-Occurring Conduct Problems in Early Adolescence.
Capaldi, Deborah
Family process and peer relationships for boys who showed depressive symptoms with or without co-occurring conduct problems in early adolescence were analyzed in this study. Also examined were outcomes in late adolescence and young adulthood including the relationship with parents and peers and graduation from high school for these boys. The sample analyzed was the Oregon Youth Study sample, an at-risk community sample. Samples were split into the following four groups: (1) co-occurring conduct problems and depressive symptoms; (2) conduct problems only; (3) depressive symptoms only; and (4) neither problem. Conduct problems were measured by teachers', parental, and children's reports. Depressive symptoms were measured by the child depression rating scale (self-report). Family process was divided into four areas such as discipline, monitoring, family activities, and parent and boy relationship. Family process was measured by parent and child interviews, observer impressions, and child report. Results showed that there was a significant stability of boy's depressive symptoms from early adolescence to the senior year of high school. These boys showed lower levels of parental supervision and involvement in early adolescence as well as poor relationship with parents and peers. At the senior year of high school these boys still showed poor relationships with parents and peers and high rates of academic failure. Boys who showed co-occurring conduct problems and depressive symptoms in early adolescence showed the highest rates of problems in young adulthood. These findings indicate that early adolescent depressive symptoms are likely to predict similar deficits in late adolescence as in early adolescence. (WP)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Oregon Youth Study
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (61st, Indianapolis, IN, March 30-April 2, 1995).