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ERIC Number: ED390085
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Apr
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
National Preferences in Business and Communication Education, II.
Curtis, Dan B.; And Others
As a follow-up to a 1989 study, this study examined, via a survey, what criteria business managers consider when hiring college graduates. A survey questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 1,000 Human Resource Managers whose names were obtained from Hugo Dunhill Mailing Lists, Inc. The respondents represented several types of organizations including corporate, public financial, service, insurance, retail, and wholesale. The questionnaire was designed to collect data regarding the hiring practices, job performance criteria, specific course values, and the ideal management profile. A follow-up questionnaire was also sent. The ultimate return rate was 37%. The instrument was patterned after the questionnaire used in the Curtis, Winsor, and Stephens 1989 study. A Likert-type scale was provided for raters to indicate the relative importance of each item on the questionnaire. Results indicated that the most important determinant in hiring practices are basic oral and written communication skills. Three of the top four--public speaking, listening, and enthusiasm--are largely oral communication skills. The importance of written communication competency has increased from fourth to second place since the 1989 study. Findings suggest that those university officials wanting to be of the greatest help to their graduates in finding employment should make sure that basic competencies in oral and written communication skills are developed. Courses in listening, interpersonal, and public communication could form the basis of meeting the oral communication competencies. (Contains 4 tables of data and 11 references.) (TB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Communication Competencies
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Central States Communication Association (Indianapolis, IN, April 19-23, 1995). For the 1989 study, see EJ 383 714.