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ERIC Number: ED389400
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995
Pages: 73
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Captive Kids: A Report on Commercial Pressures on Kids at School.
Consumers Union of the United States, Yonkers, NY. Education Services.
This report identifies some of the different forms that in-school commercialism takes, from outright advertising in school hallways to sponsored educational materials that often contain brand-name plugs and biased messages. It examines the reasons why corporations and other commercial organizations are interested in marketing to kids in the classroom, and how they do so. The report also explores the problems that in-school commercialism can create, the arguments for and against allowing such commercialism into schools, and the efforts to control it. The report evaluates and rates a wide selection of sponsored educational materials, in-school contests, sponsored television, and incentive programs that have achieved access to children at school, including the in-school television news programs Channel One and Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom. Finally, the report concludes by offering recommendations on how the corporate sector, parents, and government can and should work together to make schools ad-free zones where young people can learn without commercial influences and pressures. Ratings charts provide the positions of 21 family and education organizations on in-school commercialism, as well as descriptions and evaluations of 111 sponsored educational materials, in-school contests, sponsored television, and incentive programs. (MDM)
Consumers Union Education Services, 101 Truman Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10703-1057 ($3).
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Consumers Union of the United States, Yonkers, NY. Education Services.
Identifiers: Channel One; CNN Newsroom; Sponsored Materials
Note: Prepared for "Zillions: For Kids." Charts contain small print.