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ERIC Number: ED389369
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Mar
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Helping Students To Experience the Classroom: Interactive Techniques for the Personality Psychology Course.
Osborne, Randall E.
A truly interactive approach in the classroom involves giving students the freedom to add their own "twist" to course materials and allowing them to decide to some degree how the information will be used. Two learning activities employed in a psychology course serve to illustrate how interactive techniques can encourage students to relate their own experience to course material. The first activity helps students understand the biased impressions individuals hold about one another. Students are asked to make a collage of images that represent their perceptions of who they are. Next, students ask someone who knows them well to make a similar collage. The assignment concludes with an essay, based on at least eight questions provided by the instructor, analyzing the differences between the two collages. The second activity is designed to understand the somewhat confusing concept of defense mechanisms as outlined by Freud and other psychologists. A group of student volunteers work out skits to demonstrate various defense mechanisms, while the remaining students write brief papers on the same topic. The volunteers then present the skits, and the class must decide which defense mechanism is being demonstrated. Interactive approaches to classroom activities present a means for instructors to move students beyond simple factual and content-based information, engaging them in ways that standard lectures do not. Sample collage questions are included. (MAB)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Freud (Sigmund)
Note: In: Teaching of Psychology: Ideas and Innovations. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Undergraduate Teaching of Psychology (9th, Ellenville, NY, March 22-24, 1995); see JC 960 009.