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ERIC Number: ED383029
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Apr
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teaching Public Relations from an American Perspective: An Assumption To Be Reconsidered.
Neff, Bonita Dostal
Teaching public relations from an American perspective should be reconsidered: current textbooks barely mention multicultural and international concerns except in most cases as a secondary issue. The current paradigm emphasizes the media with the first amendment serving as the cornerstone of the emphasis. The American approach to international and multicultural concerns is primarily an "awareness" emphasis. The difficulty in clearly understanding the operating premises of other cultures was demonstrated when a public relations educator from the United Arab Emirate and an American public relations class had trouble articulating their cultures' underlying premises (first amendment versus a religious source). Three changes need to be considered to work toward developing an international community: (1) a paradigm shift away from the concept of publics to interpersonal communication; (2) multicultural training instead of an awareness approach to culture should be the goal in teaching public relations; and (3) teaching future professionals to learn to appreciate other cultures and to gain greater insights and understanding about each other's culture. These steps will require significant change towards teaching public relations. Shifting the paradigm towards interpersonal communication while providing indepth multicultural training will provide the basis for a more sensitive cultural exchange and will more likely support the building of an international community. (Contains 10 references.) (Author/RS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: First Amendment; International Public Relations; Internationalism
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Central States Communication Association (Indianapolis, IN, April 19-23, 1995).