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ERIC Number: ED381977
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-Mar
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
WISC-III/WISC-R Relationships in Special Education Re-evaluations.
Smith, Douglas K.; And Others
This study examined the relationship between scores on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III) and the older Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R). School psychologists in Wisconsin were asked to provide data on 300 special education re-evaluations completed during the 1992-93 academic year. Pearson product moment correlations ranged from .80 on the Verbal Scale to .85 on the Full Scale. T-tests for related samples were significant for all global scales, with WISC-III scores lower than WISC-R scores (mean difference of 3.65 to 5.69 points). The study concluded that: (1) WISC-III scores are consistent with those on the WISC-R; (2) correlational data for global scales and individual subtests suggest that they are measuring similar constructs; (3) individual cases of large differences in scores (16 points or more) may occur; (4) score differences are most likely to occur on the Performance Scale and least likely to occur on the Verbal Scale; (5) largest mean differences on subtests occurred on Similarities, Picture Arrangement, and Object Assembly subtests; (6) smallest mean differences on subtests occurred on Information, Digit Span, and Coding subtests; and (7) use of the WISC-III as a replacement for the WISC-R is strongly supported. Tables and graphs detailing study findings are attached. Four tables and three figures present the data. (DB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Special Education Reevaluations; Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children III; Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (Revised)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists (Seattle, WA, March 1994).