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ERIC Number: ED381798
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Mar
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Rhetoricizing the Teacher's Position: Or What To Make of the Ghost of "Process" in Multicultural Pedagogies.
Mahala, Dan; Swilky, Jody
Peter Medway recounts the beginnings of the language across the curriculum (LAC) movement in Britain in the 1950s and 1960s when teachers were troubled by their encounters with bright but non-academic working-class children who failed in school and yet whose verbal resourcefulness and fertility were an inescapable fact. Thus teachers were led to the conclusion that the failure of this group should not be ascribed to slowness or dullness but rather to "a discontinuity between two sorts of language, theirs and the school's." This thumbnail sketch of the British expressivist writing movement recovers the social activist roots of the expressivist movement--something that has been lost in conceptualization of the classroom community as a "safe place" where the uniqueness of the student's voice can be heard through his or her rendering of "experience" and "authenticity." Given the greater depth of thinking about difference that multicultural and postcolonial theory has made available, post-process pedagogies can no longer equate official voices and knowledge with the voice of the teacher. An illustration of one student essay shows one approach to teaching expressivist writing--encouraging students to tell stories as a means of articulating the different ways they align themselves with and against social norms and mainstream thinking. One aim of such an approach is to recognize the self as always emerging from an interaction between cultures. (TB)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Composition Theory
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (46th Washington, DC, March 23-25, 1995).