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ERIC Number: ED381491
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Multiculturalism in the Professional Studies...Or Pardon Me I Believe Your Values May Be Showing.
Messner, Kyle Ann
This study examined how preservice teachers in a large southwestern university experience multiculturalism which has been infused across the professional studies curriculum. The university is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) which requires that accredited institutions address the issue of cultural diversity in the professional studies courses. Five students (four Anglo and one Mexican-American) who were in the Early Childhood block program were interviewed and observed; textbooks, syllabi, and class notes were examined. Classes observed included Language Arts, Classroom Organization and Management, Principles and Applications of Effective Instruction, and Computer Applications. Findings indicated that students were hearing issues and concerns rather than specific content or skills such as how to modify curriculum or teaching styles. Information was fragmented and was not being included in assessments or evaluations. Generally, language issues were addressed, with some minor references to ethnicity and cultural effects. There appeared to be a relationship between students' specific coursework in multicultural education and the ability to notice or "hear" multiculturalism in other courses. The paper concludes that there is a lack of parallelism between the ideal and formal levels of multiculturalism and the experiential level of curriculum as it relates to multiculturalism in the professional studies courses. (Contains 13 references.) (JDD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Educ; Preservice Teachers
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Atlanta, GA, April 12-16, 1993).