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ERIC Number: ED381304
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Mar
Pages: 7
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Drug Use in Rural America: What You Can Do about It.
Devlin, Sandy D.
Individuals with disabilities have been identified as one of the nation's largest populations at risk for drug use. Recent studies indicate a higher rate for alcohol and drug use among the disabled population than the general population. In an effort to identify drug use among rural disabled students, data were collected from students ages 12-18 identified as mentally retarded, learning disabled, and behavior disordered in 20 rural settings in 3 southeastern states. Based on results of the Typology of Adolescent Drug Use, each student was classified into one of eight drug use types including polydrug use, stimulant use, periodic drug use, marijuana and alcohol use, heavy alcohol use, experimental use, light alcohol use, and no use. These categories were then collapsed to high, medium, and low drug and alcohol use. Results indicate significant drug use among disabled students in rural settings. Students appear to be at particular risk due to low self-esteem, poor resiliency skills, low academic achievement, and lack of access to drug-prevention programs. One program developed to build resilience among rural disabled students includes components such as developing social competency, developing autonomy, building ability to solve problems and make good decisions, and facilitating awareness of the dangers of using drugs. Contains 15 references and 2 tables of survey data. (LP)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Resilience (Personality); Typology of Adolescent Drug Use
Note: In: Reaching to the Future: Boldly Facing Challenges in Rural Communities. Conference Proceedings of the American Council on Rural Special Education (ACRES) (Las Vegas, Nevada, March 15-18, 1995); see RC 020 016.