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ERIC Number: ED373735
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Embedding Metacognitive Cues into Hypermedia Systems To Promote Far Transfer Problem Solving.
Lin, Xiaodong; And Others
A pretest-posttest control group design with random assignment, together with qualitative data collection and analysis, was used to investigate whether metacognitive, cognitive, and affective-awareness cues embedded in a hypermedia program could facilitate college students' near and far transfer problem solving in biology learning. It was assumed that when subjects are asked to explain reasons for their own actions during the problem solving, they must engage in self-reflective intermediate processes comparable to metacognitive processes of monitoring, evaluating, and regulating ongoing problem solving. Four treatment groups were used: one received metacognitive cues; one received cognitive cues; one received affective-awareness cues; and the control group received no cues. Results showed that subjects in the metacognitive group performed better on far transfer tasks than all other groups. The qualitative analysis indicated that metacognitive-oriented questions encouraged students to "stop, think, and reflect" on their problem solving process which in turn helped students understand the process of how the problems were solved. The understanding of processes students went through to solve problems helped them transfer what they learned to novel situations. The near and far transfer test of problem solving is included in the appendix. (Contains 30 references.) (Author/JLB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: In: Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1994 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division (16th, Nashville, TN, February 16-20, 1994); see IR 016 784.