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ERIC Number: ED373315
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-Apr-4
Pages: 49
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Three Instructional Conditions in Text Structure on Upper Elementary Students' Reading Comprehension and Writing Performance.
Troyer, Sandra J.
A study tested the effectiveness of three instructional strategies in three expository text structures on students' reading comprehension and writing performance. Subjects, 173 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: mental modeling, graphic organizer, or a control read/answer group. They received instruction in the characteristics of three text structures: attribution, collection, and comparison. Reading comprehension and writing performance were measured six times during the 6-week period. Results indicated: (1) significant effects for treatment, time of measurement and reading ability, and significant interaction effects for time by grade; (2) the most effective strategy was use of graphic organizers; (3) attribution and comparison tests were significantly higher than collection tests; and (4) fifth graders achieved the highest scores on most reading comprehension measures. Results of writing performance measures indicated main effects for time of measurement and treatment; students wrote significantly better after attribution and comparison formats than after the collection pattern; mental modeling outperformed the control group on the attribution and the immediate writing samples, while both mental modeling and graphic organizer conditions outperformed the control group on the delayed writing sample. Results also indicated that attribution and comparison formats were the most salient with upper elementary students after instruction, while student interview responses demonstrated positive attitudes and higher content knowledge among students in the experimental groups. (Contains 59 references; includes 10 tables and 2 figures of data. A mental modeling attribution example, a comparison example, and an example of the read and answer group's task are attached.) (RS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Expository Text
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (75th, New Orleans, LA, April 4-8, 1994).