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ERIC Number: ED370473
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-May-3
Pages: 80
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Baccalaureate Student Graduation, Time-to-Degree, and Retention at Illinois Public Universities.
Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.
This report examines baccalaureate student graduation, time-to-degree, and retention at Illinois state universities and presents data on these issues in 21 tables. The analysis notes that a little more than half of all public university first-time freshmen earn a bachelor's degree and that less than 3 percent of freshmen complete their degrees in less than 4 academic years and about 25 percent complete their degrees in the traditional 4 academic years. Eventually about 55 percent of freshmen graduate. Among minority students graduation rates are lower and time-to-degree is longer. Conclusions reinforce current priorities to improve student access, choice, preparation for college-level work and undergraduate academic experience. Policy efforts to address these issues should continue. The tables which make up the bulk of the document present data on degree completion of first-time freshmen; degree completion of first-time freshmen from Black, Hispanic, and other minority groups; average graduation rates of first-time freshmen; average graduation rates of Black, Hispanic, and other first-time freshmen; trends in transfer patterns among first-time freshmen between 1983 and 1988; degree attainment, enrollment status, and non-persistence among first-time freshmen; degree attainment, enrollment status, and non-persistence among Black, Hispanic, and all other first-time freshmen; and enrollment duration among dropouts (all, Black, Hispanic, and all others). (JB)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.
Identifiers: Illinois
Note: For related documents, see HE 027 432 and ED 366 283.