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ERIC Number: ED369002
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Aug-21
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Values Should Be Taught in the Public Schools!
Mayton, Daniel M., II
A random telephone survey of 562 residents of the Pacific Northwest was designed and conducted to determine public sentiment toward the teaching of values within the public schools. The respondents were asked either the open-ended question of whether it was appropriate to teach values within the public school curriculum, or one of two closed-format questions about sets of specific values taken from the Rokeach Value Survey. Schwartz and Bilsky's theories on human values were used to characterize the values on which the public was surveyed. The respondents believed it very appropriate to teach values within the public school curriculum as 69.6% of respondents indicated values definitely should be taught while only 6.5% said definitely not. The results of this survey point to the universalism and benevolent value types as being considered particularly relevant by the public for school curriculums. Support for teaching values of conformity (obedient, self-control, and polite), self-direction (freedom and ambition), and security (family security) was also strongly present. Respondents were either opposed to or equivocal about teaching hedonism, stimulation, or religious values in the schools. The survey shows avoidance of teaching specific values clearly needs reassessment. (CC)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: United States (Northwest)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (101st, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, August 20-24, 1993).