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ERIC Number: ED368822
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993
Pages: 197
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Keeping Track of New York City's Children.
Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, NY.
This report is a comprehensive study of the status of children and their families in New York City. It measures how well children are doing by using widely recognized indicators of well-being, and it measures the need, use, and accessibility of services to help children. "Keeping Track" focuses on community-level data, examining the 59 community districts in New York for different racial and ethnic groups. Data are also supplied to show how children in New York are faring in relation to those of the state and the country as a whole. Chapters consider economic factors, housing, nutrition, health and the environment, safety, and child care issues. Chapter 9 focuses on the education of the city's children. The city school system is the largest in the country, with 972,000 students and an annual budget of nearly $7 billion. Only 47 percent of students read at or above their grade level, and only 58 percent test at or above their grade level in mathematics. Only approximately 39 percent graduate from high school in 4 years. The New York schools educate a tremendous diversity of students, with diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and a variety of educational and social needs. The information in this report clarifies the needs of New York's children as a step toward providing the best childhood and education for each. Data are presented in 150 figures. Appendix 1 discusses data constraints, and Appendix 2 contains four tables of summary data. (SLD)
Citizen's Committee for Children, 105 E. 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010-5413 ($25; quantity price, $15).
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, NY.
Identifiers: New York City Board of Education; New York (New York)
Note: Paper presented at the National Conference of the National Association of Child Advocates PATHWAYS TO A BETTER TOMORROW (New Brunswick, NJ, November 11-14, 1993).