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ERIC Number: ED368820
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Nov
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teachers' Perceptions of Effective Classroom Management within an Inner-City Middle School.
Turner, Catana L.
This study was undertaken to obtain descriptive information about teachers' perceptions of effective classroom management within an inner-city middle school. Thirteen teachers in one such school in Tennessee were interviewed about their classroom management behaviors. Teachers appeared to have an elaborate system of beliefs related to the themes of establishing and maintaining control over their students, forming teacher expectations, and identifying the influences of the home environment. A central theme was that these teachers put a heavy emphasis on controlling student behavior to establish order and to plan and organize academic concerns, even though controlling procedures had not alleviated or lessened classroom conflict. Although they indicated that they believed teachers should not lower their standards, they did, in fact, lessen requirements for these students. They also indicated that, because of perceived home and community influences, they could not expect these students to perform in the same manner as students from other home environments. The home was regarded as a major source of problems for these students. The teachers did believe that they themselves were doing as well as they could under difficult circumstances. The process of improving inner-city schools could well begin with exposing teachers to training that recognizes the importance of cultural awareness for teachers. (Contains 26 references.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Control (Social Behavior)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, November 10-12, 1993).