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ERIC Number: ED368570
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-Mar
Pages: 30
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Three Hypotheses about Domain Specific Background Knowledge and Achievement in Science.
Piburn, Michael D.
The purpose of this paper is to test three hypotheses about background knowledge that arise from the literature of cognitive psychology. The data base consists of the matrices of correlation coefficients that have been accumulated as part of an ongoing meta-analysis of factors influencing attitude and achievement in science. A search of the "Journal of Research in Science Teaching" from 1983-1992 yielded 44 articles which contained a total of 186 usable correlation coefficients. Hypothesis #1 states: A large amount of the variance in measured intelligence results from the effects of background knowledge. This hypothesis was rejected. Hypothesis #2 states: A large amount of the variance in measured cognitive level results from the effects of background knowledge. This hypothesis was accepted. Hypothesis #3 states: A large amount of the variance in measured achievement in science results from the effects of background knowledge. This hypothesis was accepted provisionally, and only in the case of procedural knowledge. In summary, the results of the paper indicate that a well-balanced program of science education addressing general intellectual skills, higher order problem solving, and scientific reasoning skills is preferable to one concentrating on background knowledge, and particularly to an over-emphasis on declarative knowledge. (PR)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Domain Knowledge
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (Anaheim, CA, March 29, 1994).