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ERIC Number: ED367992
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993
Pages: 5
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Eat, Drink and Be Merry for Tomorrow You Teach.
Royster, Jacqueline Jones
Bread Loaf News, v6 n2 p29-31 Fall-Win 1993
Several summers of engaging in dialogue and debate have led one scholar to examine closely the ways and means of English Studies in light of contemporary conditions and restraints--particularly as pertains to American literature. As a woman of African American descent, she appreciates Black Southern culture. As their rhetorical and literary history illustrates, African American women writers and readers seem to perceive a certain inevitability about their stations in life. Writers such as Alice Walker and Anna Julia Cooper present metaphorical strategies for countering such inevitability. There seems to exist among African American women a deeply encoded message that encourages them to seize every opportunity to count. Choices in curricula, content, pedagogy, and assessment present such opportunities. Every day English teachers structure activities designed to enable them and their students to develop their powers of imagination to the extent that they can envision a world in which people have the courage and compassion to imagine themselves in better worlds and the commitment to work relentlessly to make it so. English teachers must act with the courage of their well-deliberated convictions and with compassion that emphasizes an individual's interconnectedness with others. Teachers must teach with a desire to talk and listen well, with an understanding that survival is a cooperative venture, and that teaching and learning are a human enterprise. (SAM)
Publication Type: Journal Articles
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: African Americans; English Teachers; United States (South); Walker (Alice)