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ERIC Number: ED367936
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-Aug
Pages: 33
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Ethnic Differences and the Effects of Racism on College Adjustment.
LeSure, G. Evelyn
This study investigated ethnic differences and the effects of racism on the college adjustment of African-American, Asian, and Latino students who attended five undergraduate predominantly Anglo-American colleges. Results indicated that social adjustment was better for Anglos than it was for Asians and Latinos. African-Americans reported the most experiences of racism and Asians reported the least. Asians and Latinos who experienced racism adjusted less well academically and socially than Asian and Latino students not subject to racism. The social adjustment of African-American students who experienced racism was less than those who did not experience racism. Academic adjustment for African-Americans was not differentially affected by racism. That the college adjustment of African-Americans was less affected by racism than it was for Asians and Latinos was explained in terms of possible differences in expectation, coping strategies, and intra-group support. Racism may have been more normative for African-Americans who were less surprised when it occurred. It was also reasoned that African-Americans may have had a greater sense of community and that this could have been an effective buffer against racism. (Author)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: African Americans; Claremont Colleges CA; Latinos
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (101st, Toronto, Canada, August 22, 1993).