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ERIC Number: ED367833
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Jul
Pages: 60
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-0-907644-16-3
ISSN: N/A
Learning at Work. Leeds Adult Learners at Work Project Final Report.
Payne, John; And Others
A study evaluated the extent to which Employee Development (ED) projects provided increased opportunities for continuing general education and training for employees in Britain. A questionnaire that sought to relate employer involvement in ED to wider issues of workplace culture, personnel, and training policies was sent to 70 firms; 50 percent responded. Only 14 questionnaires (20 percent) sent to a control group were returned. Follow-up visits were made to 11 firms. Findings indicated that many firms were laying off employees but were expecting more of those who remained. Broad-based ED schemes reached a significant percentage of the work force. In some firms there was cooperation over ED, but two other prevalent attitudes were that ED was a management prerogative and ED was a way of dividing the work force. Positive outcomes for ED participants were as follows: compensation for negative experiences in earlier education; elimination of barriers to participation caused by shift work; employee development beyond current job requirements; equal opportunities; personal confidence; and preparation for an unpredictable labor market. Employers hoped ED would help employees better understand the organization, encourage flexibility, develop a learning culture, and create an internal labor market. Recommendations were made for short-term changes in practice and long-term changes in policy. (Appendixes include contacts' addresses, abbreviations, and 72 references.) (YLB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Leeds Univ. (England). Dept. of Adult and Continuing Education.
Identifiers: Great Britain
Note: Cover title varies: "Adult Learners at Work." This research project was funded by the Universities Funding Council.