NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED367446
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Sep
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Coherence: The Student Perspective.
Harris, Susan; And Others
This report discusses interim results of a 4-year study of curriculum coherence in British secondary schools, part of an initiative on the quality of teaching and learning called Making Your Way through Secondary School: Students' Experiences of Teaching and Learning (1991-1995). Of the three main criteria for judging the quality of curricula--breadth, balance, and coherence--coherence has been neglected by teachers and planners. Curriculum coherence, often confused with curriculum commonality and consistency, should be seen as the degree to which each student perceives connections between the various subjects the student is learning. The study is based on interviews, conducted once per school term, with three groups of secondary school students. The first interviews were conducted when the students were 12 years old and the last interviews will be conducted when the students are 16 years old. The interviews on which the present report is based were conducted when the students were 14 years old. Though student comments occasionally betrayed an awareness of connections within and among school subjects, students generally showed little awareness of coherence within subjects or across the curriculum. The students were acutely aware of when they did not understand what they thought they should be learning, however, and when asked about their sense of connectedness to school subjects, occasionally expressed a feeling of being lost with a whole subject. Various teaching methods, such as field trips and project work, were identified by students as helping them feel connected to their studies. (ME)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Curriculum Coherence; Great Britain
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association (Liverpool, England, United Kingdom, September 10-13, 1993).