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ERIC Number: ED366809
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Dec
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Teaching of Work Ethics: Current Practices of Work Program Coordinators in Georgia.
Ford, Frances Annette; Herren, Ray V.
A study examined the perceptions and practices of 160 work program coordinators in Georgia (44% of the sample) regarding the teaching of work ethics. A literature review had shown that a consistent view of potential employers was that graduates of vocational education programs should be well grounded in the concept of work ethics. The main purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which the concept of the work ethic was being taught by the coordinators. The questionnaire that was developed used items concerning moral development theory, moral education, and enabling work ethics. Findings indicated that, although work program coordinators believed they were prepared to teach work ethics and believed that work ethics could be taught in school, the teaching of work ethics in their classrooms was informal or unintentional. Discussion of workplace problems was by far the most often used activity to teach work ethics. While the coordinators indicated that they promoted behaviors which they believed teachers should promote and in which students should engage, they did not believe their students learned these behaviors very well. These findings implied that work program coordinators should be given extensive inservice training in the teaching of enabling work ethics and a curriculum should be developed to enable work program coordinators to teach an enabling work ethic in a developmental and intentional way. (Appendixes include 32 references and 5 data tables.) (YLB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Georgia
Note: Paper presented at the American Vocational Association Convention (Nashville, TN, December 1993).