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ERIC Number: ED366522
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993
Pages: 156
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Why Some People Just Can't Speak Up: Gender Bias in the Classroom.
Williams, Lisa J.
This paper examines the issue of gender bias in education. Major components of the thesis include research in Vermont schools and secondary sources including the 1992 American Association of University Women report. The paper includes three main divisions. The first part addresses the paradox of trying to study gender, including some basic theories on what gender is and how it is developed. The second part looks at school and its role in promoting gender differences. The final section offers resources and suggestions for change. The major finding is that the educational system socializes the sexes into specific roles based on tradition, bias, and the widespread desire to maintain the status quo. Due to the contrast between traditional feminine roles and the behaviors necessary for educational excellence, females often suffer in coeducational settings. Specific areas covered include the following: (1) an explication of research that strongly supports the conclusion that nurture rather than nature produces differences between the sexes; (2) a discussion of the family and peers' roles in gender socialization; (3) a historical overview of the education of women; (4) a case study of Cuba showing how schools are used in the intentional socialization of gender roles; (5) a focus on educators' attention, students' participation, and expectations of both; (6) a look at how the curriculum often discourages females from realizing their potential; and (7) various suggestions to make the educational system a more equitable one. Contains 45 references. (Author/DK)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Cuba; Vermont
Note: Master's Thesis, School for International Training.