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ERIC Number: ED366455
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Some Cultural Differences in Academic Motivational Orientations between American and Chinese Students.
Leung, Jupian J.
A study examined the effects of students' ethnicity on measures of the meaning of success in school and a preference for school feedback. A questionnaire was distributed to 333 white American students in eastern Wisconsin and 375 Hong Kong Chinese 8th- through 12-graders. Results showed a significantly higher proportion of American than Chinese students ranked "getting good grades" or "doing as well as or better than others in your class" as most important among five measures of the meaning of success, whereas a significantly higher proportion of Chinese than American students ranked "behaving well" as most important. A significantly higher proportion of American than Chinese students ranked "your grades on tests and assignments" as the most important among five measures of preference for school feedback, whereas a significantly higher proportion of Chinese than American students ranked "you are able to do better and better" or "how hard you work" as most important. The results suggest that the Chinese cultural values that place an emphasis on effort and self-improvement may be a reason why Chinese students' academic achievement tends to be higher than that of their American peers. (MDM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Hong Kong; United States (Midwest)