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ERIC Number: ED365613
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Sep
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Using Internetworking Resources in the Political Science Classroom.
Manrique, Cecilia G.
This document addresses the various sources of information that the political scientist can rely on and make use of via electronic mail. What network sources are available, where they can be found, what to do to get them, how to use them, and what sources to make use of in order to obtain maximum information are discussed. The article examines the question of how these network resources can be incorporated in various courses and how useful they can be to the individual faculty member who chooses to invest some time in learning about these resources. The paper focuses on some of the advantages and disadvantages of using electronic mail in specific courses. Its uses in courses like Women and Politics, Comparative Politics, Asian Government and Politics, Global Issues, and American National Government are described. Faculty members are discovering that information networks can be an effective means for communicating with their students as well as colleagues from other institutions. Electronic mail has been an effective venue for an institution's trilateral goals of trying to bring together computing, writing, and internationalizing the curriculum. The paper includes a section on student feedback on the use of Internet resources in several courses at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Samples of responses to a survey are included. Those who enjoyed using electronic mail emphasized how they were able to use it to contact others and use the available resources for many courses. Those who objected were those who could not, or did not want to spend time in a computer laboratory. (DK)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Researchers; Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (Washington, DC, September 2-5, 1993).