NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED364296
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Mar
Pages: 7
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Starting at the Top: Using Hierarchical Structure To Train College Students To Summarize.
Selinger, Barry; And Others
A study was conducted of the effectiveness of summarization training as a means of improving reading comprehension and retention among developmental English students in a community college. A sample of 58 community college students in five developmental reading classes was randomly assigned to either a summarization treatment or control group. The control group received training in vocabulary and comprehension for 1.25 hours per week for 5 weeks. The summarization training group received instruction for the same amount of time on identifying the central thesis, major concepts, and details closely supporting these concepts. Both groups were assigned, graded, and given feedback on related assignments. After training, both groups were tested on summarization and reading, and 1 week later, on delayed recall of the last passage summarized. The summarization training group performed substantially better than the control group on the summarization post-test. Almost 73% of the summarization training group included 70% or more of information deemed necessary for inclusion in the summary, compared to 14% of the control group. For delayed recall of the material, the effect for training group was not significant, though there was a trend favoring those who were trained in summarization and those who scored highest on the post-test. Based on study findings, it was concluded that developmental students can be taught to analyze the top-level structure of reading material, across a range of cognitive abilities. (ECC)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Educational Research Association (15th, Hilton Head, SC, March 5-9, 1992).