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ERIC Number: ED362881
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Writing To Learn in English: A Synthesis of Research and Instructional Practices.
Allen, Sheilah
Although English teachers have implicitly been aware of the functions of writing, they may not always have explored the ways writing can be used to enhance learning: learning of content, of skills, and of self. Arthur Applebee noted that English teachers were most likely to stress personal and imaginative experiences in their writing assignments, although testing of subject-area content was reported to be an important use of writing in 46% of their classrooms. The most common assignments in English classes are the expository essay, the personal narrative, and the journal. Less widely used but still popular are the study guide and the formal and informal letter. One activity for developing the ability to summarize, a necessary skill for writing an effective essay, is precis writing, which, it is emphasized, is a brief version of the original and should not be confused with a paraphrase or a summary/abstract, both of which are defined in turn. The student journal is the most popular "new" arrival on the writing-to-learn scene, perhaps because it can be a documentary of both academic and personal growth. Student journals are particularly effective in shaping daily classroom activities to permit students to achieve more active, involved roles in the learning process. One final writing activity which can involve both creative and expository writing is the formal and informal letter. Writing provides students with the opportunity for self-expression, enabling them to react on both cognitive and affective levels to the ideas, information, and emotions they encounter as they gain an understanding of themselves and their relation to the world. (Contains 66 references.) (NH)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Purpose (Composition); Writing Contexts; Writing Functions; Writing Thinking Relationship; Writing to Learn