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ERIC Number: ED362675
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Jan
Pages: 5
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Child-Care Arrangements of Young Working Mothers. Data from the National Longitudinal Surveys. Work and Family. Report 820.
Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.
Child-care arrangements of young working mothers were examined in a study using data from the Youth cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience. The data provided information on a sample of young men and women who were between the ages of 14 and 22 in 1979 and who have been interviewed annually since then. The data represented the primary child-care arrangements for the youngest child of working mothers aged 23-31 in 1988. The sample was restricted to those women whose youngest child was age 5 and under and was not in school. Some of the findings of the study were the following: (1) the use of relatives was the most common form of child care, with approximately 40 percent of women using family to care for their child while they work; (2) 28 percent of the care was provided by nonrelatives and about 23 percent by organized child care facilities; (3) the average weekly child-care expenditure for all women in the study was $64.39; (4) there were very few differences in child care arrangements between married and single mothers, although married mothers had substantially higher child-care expenditures than single mothers; (5) fewer Whites than Hispanics and Blacks used relatives for child care; (6) more Blacks used child-care centers than did other racial groups; (7) women with higher incomes used child-care centers more than women with lower incomes; and (8) women who work part time were more likely to use relatives for child care than women who work full time. (KC)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.
Identifiers: Family Work Relationship; National Longitudinal Survey Youth Labor Market Ex