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ERIC Number: ED362504
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Sep
Pages: 42
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Long Term Impact of a New Approach to Teacher Education for Primary Science.
Summers, Mike; Kruger, Colin
This paper reports the results of a 2-year longitudinal study of the development of primary teachers' understanding of science concepts (specifically, "force" and "energy") following inservice education, and the extent to which movement towards the scientific view was achieved and maintained. The approach to inservice education made extensive use of constructivist strategies and analogical reasoning to promote the qualitative learning of science concepts. The long term development in conceptual understanding of a sample of 53 primary school teachers was monitored in depth over the 2-year research period. Some of the principal research findings were: (1) nearly all teachers did improve their understanding of force and energy considerably, and this improvement was still evident 6 to 12 months following inservice training; (2) following training, all teachers had moved substantially towards the scientific view; (3) some concepts were more easily acquired than others; (4) there was evidence of "slipping back," i.e., marked short-term gains which were no longer so evident in the longer term; (5) teachers may retain misconceptions even when these are addressed intensively, and teachers may develop new misconceptions as a result of training; (6) in the long term, teachers were able to recall a wide range of bothe general and concept-specific aspects of the training, which they perceived as helpful in developing their understanding. Implications of these findings and 10 statistical tables complete the document. (Contains 35 references.) (LL)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: United Kingdom
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the British Educational Research Association (Liverpool, England, United Kingdom, September 1993).