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ERIC Number: ED362199
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Jan
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Digitized Speech as Feedback in Computer-Based Instruction.
Sales, Gregory C.; Johnston, Michael D.
Two studies were conducted in an effort to better understand the role of digitized speech as feedback in computer assisted instruction (CAI). The first study examined the use of familiar and unfamiliar voice feedback in two CAI lessons designed to teach advertising techniques to fifth graders. Subjects were 100 fifth graders from suburban Minneapolis (Minnesota). No differences were found between responses to the familiar and unfamiliar voices. In the second study, 145 sixth graders and a subset of 41 high and 49 low reading ability students from suburban Minneapolis (Minnesota) listened to feedback that was spoken audio only, printed and spoken, and spoken by an animated character. Analysis indicates that the type of feedback makes no significant difference, although there is a consistent tendency for students receiving the voice only feedback to score higher on the posttest, possibly because supplementing with text or graphics divides learners' attention. Overall results suggest that whose voice is used seems to be of little importance, although the gender of the speaker can influence performance. Females outperformed males when a female voice was used. When the agent was male, no effect for gender was found. Students appeared to enjoy the animated characters and to talk back to the computer more than did students in other treatments. Nine figures and four tables illustrate the findings. (Contains 18 references.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Digitizing
Note: In: Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Presentations at the Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division (15th, New Orleans, Louisiana, January 13-17, 1993); see IR 016 300.