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ERIC Number: ED351164
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
For the Administrator: Realities for the Native American and Education.
Bold Warrior, Sherman
For historical, cultural and sociological reasons, the American Indian's own perspective has been missing from the discussion on Indian education. Historically, White American government, education, literature, and entertainment have all played roles in the annihilation of Native communities and cultures. As children, Midwestern Indians born approximately between 1895 and 1920 were taken from their families and put into special federal schools. For them, and for many of their descendants, elements of White culture was seen as oppressive and untrustworthy. With fear, illiteracy, and poverty, American Indians rejected the dominate White society and its education institution. The idea of education was never foreign to Native Americans, however. Education enabled them to live very well in their own world. To Indians, education is a very personal means of promoting their societal and personal survival, not by greed, but by selflessness, generosity, and courage. White educational strategies have increasingly alienated Native Americans. New demographics suggest that public education might benefit if Native American and other cultures were better accommodated. Racist policies of assimilation must be replaced by education that comes to terms with Native Americans. Instead of changing the people to fit the system, it is time to change the system to fit the people. (TES)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Native Americans
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).